Capitals in Sicily

Beautiful capital in the Monreale Cathedral

Sicily

Capital in the Monreale cathedral.

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

Monreale - the Benedictine Cloister

The Benedictine Cloister was completed c. 1200. It measures 47x47 metres and is located on the south side of the cathedral. Each side has 26 arches resting on columns. The splendid capitals include narrative cycles from the Old and New Testaments.

Capitals in the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

The capitals in the cloister of the abbey of Monreale were carved from white marble, but over time has acquired a thick, sandstone patina that covers them almost entirely.

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Adam and Eve are shown naked next to the Tree of Knowledge. Eve reaches for the forbidden fruit.

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

 

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

Capital, the Benedictine Cloister, Monreale

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

San Cataldo

Sicily

One of the surviving capitals in San Cataldo. The capitals in San Cataldo are all different.

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

Twin columns in the beautiful cloister garden (13th century) at San Giovanni degli Eremiti.

Photo: Per-Erik Skramstad / Wonders of Sicily

 

 

UNESCO’s World Heritage List

Arab-Norman Palermo and the Cathedral Churches of Cefalú and Monreale (Italy) - new on the list (2015)

Located on the northern coast of Sicily, Arab-Norman Palermo includes a series of nine civil and religious structures dating from the era of the Norman kingdom of Sicily (1130-1194): two palaces, three churches, a cathedral, a bridge, as well as the cathedrals of Cefalú and Monreale. Collectively, they are an example of a social-cultural syncretism between Western, Islamic and Byzantine cultures on the island which gave rise to new concepts of space, structure and decoration. They also bear testimony to the fruitful coexistence of people of different origins and religions (Muslim, Byzantine, Latin, Jewish, Lombard and French).

Palermo

Norman Cathedrals